Music that Inspire me #1…

Music has always played an important roll in my life. It’s almost as if there is a sound track to the various chapters as I’ve grown. It gets into my soul and takes me away. Makes my creative mind stir and weaves imagery as rich as my deepest dreams and sweeps my imagination into a place of connection and peace. This is the first of many pieces I am going to share with you. I have listened to it several times over the last year while driving out to Bragg Creek. The mountains loom as I listen and eventually it will be the score to one of many short films I am going to create over the next year. I can hardly wait to get them underway. When I quickly did a search for the song, I found this in Wikipedia and after reading it, I was amazed to see how many things in my life are reflected in this particular song and meaning behind the title. I love astronomy and the heavens although I have to say I have never been good at math. When someone asks me about God, I say we will never understand the true essence of what that really means. It is simply beyond us. I describe it as a “Hum” that occupies the entire universe.

Reminds me of August Rush, one of my favourite movies. Things happen for a reason as I’m beginning to see…

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From Wikipedia

Musica universalis  or Harmony of the Spheres is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun,Moon, and planets—as a form of musica (the Medieval Latin name for music). This ‘music’ is not usually thought to be literally audible, but a harmonic and/or mathematical and/or religious concept. The idea continued to appeal to thinkers about music until the end of the Renaissance, influencing scholars of many kinds, including humanists.

The Music of the Spheres incorporates the metaphysical principle that mathematical relationships express qualities or ‘tones’ of energy which manifest in numbers, visual angles, shapes and sounds – all connected within a pattern of proportion. Pythagoras first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in proportion to the length of the string that produces it, and that intervals between harmonious sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios.[1] In a theory known as the Harmony of the Spheres, Pythagoras proposed that the Sun, Moon and planets all emit their own unique hum (orbital resonance) based on their orbital revolution,[2] and that the quality of life on Earth reflects the tenor of celestial sounds which are physically imperceptible to the human ear.[3] Subsequently, Plato described astronomy and music as “twinned” studies of sensual recognition: astronomy for the eyes, music for the ears, and both requiring knowledge of numerical proportions.[4]